Sedona, Ariz., Red Rocks and Energy Vortexes

Cathedral Rock in Sedona, Arizona. Photo by Lear Miller courtesy of Visit Sedona.

Cathedral Rock in Sedona, Arizona. Photo by Lear Miller courtesy of Visit Sedona.

The words “rugged” and “resort” rarely go together, but in the stunning town of Sedona, you can have both.

From incredible restaurants to breathtaking hikes, this town of 10,000 residents offers phenomenal outdoor recreation, a thriving art scene and possibly a spiritual experience.

Sedona is home to a handful of vortexes believed to be special energy centers that offer inspiration and healing. If you only have a day, hike the family-friendly Cathedral Rock in the morning and watch the sunset from Airport Mesa.

“It’s a very individualized experience,” says Michelle Conway, Sedona’s chamber of commerce and tourism bureau’s marketing director, referring to the vortexes. “Some feel they gained mental clarity, and some just enjoy the view.”

In between, explore Sedona with the Pink Jeep off-road adventure tours. Later, cool down in Slide Rock State Park.

As night falls, don’t forget to look up.

“They roll up the sidewalks here at 9 p.m.,” says Sheryl Curtis, who works with Conway as a digital producer. “The nightlife is the Milky Way above you.”

Sedona by the Numbers

3 million Annual visitors
500 Artists
1.8 million National forest acres
1 Teal McDonald’s arch
10,000 Residents
68-plus Mountain biking trails
40 Galleries
4 Major vortexes

Sedona’s Legendary Vortexes

Bell Rock outside of Sedona, Arizona

Bell Rock outside of Sedona, Arizona

Sedona Arizona is well known as having a concentration of energy vortexes. These are sacred places that either have an upslope of energy or an inflow of energy which facilitates meditation, prayer, or healing.

Some people experience the sensation of vibration in the air or emanating from the ground. Other people feel a subtle, non-physical energy that amplifies emotions or spiritually. Yet others talk about communication with the living earth, ancient peoples, or aliens through brain wave patterns.

The entire area of greater Sedona is thought to be saturated with energy, however there are also four main vortex sites that are well known in the red rocks. These are Cathedral Rock, Airport Mesa, Boynton Canyon, and Bell Rock. Some guides also include Spaceship Rock and Munds Trail on the strong list.

Before you go: The main vortexes require parking passes. Stop by the Sedona Visitor Center at 331 Forest Rd. for your parking pass, a map, and directions. While you are there, you can get advice and information from Sedona experts.

What to bring: Water, sun block, and a respectful intent. These places are held sacred by Native Americans and religions. Please come with an open mind and reverence.

Calling All Foodies… Sedona’s Restaurants

Despite its small size, Sedona is a magnet for food lovers. Here are some of our favorites.

Cowboy Club Grille & Spirits

Sedona's Cowboy Club Grille & Spirits. Photo courtesy of the Sedona Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Bureau

Sedona’s Cowboy Club Grille & Spirits. Photo courtesy of the Sedona Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Bureau

For a true western experience, dine amid casual country western decor and order wild rattlesnake cakes and elk chops, along with steaks, burgers and salads. 241 Hwy. 89A; 928-282-4200; cowboyclub.com

Dahl & DiLuca

Sedona's Dahl & DiLuca Restaurant. Photo by Scott Yates courtesy of Clever House Media

Sedona’s Dahl & DiLuca Restaurant. Photo by Scott Yates courtesy of Clever House Media

A longtime Sedona favorite, you’ll experience fine dining with impeccable service, live piano music and incredible Italian food, including homemade pastas. 2321 Hwy. 89A; 928-282-5219; dahlanddiluca.com

Elote Cafe

A favorite dish at the Elote Cafe in Sedona. Photo by Janise Witt courtesy of Elote Cafe

A favorite dish at the Elote Cafe in Sedona. Photo by Janise Witt courtesy of Elote Cafe

The vibrant Mexican-inspired flavors in each dish take dining to a new level. Put your name in at 4:30 p.m. at this first-come, first-served favorite. 771 Hwy. 179; 928-203-0105; elotecafe.com

Explore Sedona and Verde Valley Parks

Slide Rock State Park

Slide Rock State Park near Sedona Arizona

Slide Rock State Park near Sedona Arizona

Wear your jeans to slide down a slick natural water chute or wade in the creek seven miles north of Sedona in Oak Creek Canyon. Learn more at azstateparks.com/parks/SLRO.

Dead Horse Ranch State Park

Lake in Dead Horse Ranch State Park in Arizona. Photo by Jason Shultz via Flickr

Lake in Dead Horse Ranch State Park in Arizona. Photo by Jason Shultz via Flickr

Stay the night in one of eight log camping cabins or spend the day fishing or on a horse trail ride. Learn more at azstateparks.com/Parks/DEHO.

Red Rock State Park

Cathedral Rock in Red Rock State Park near Sedona

Cathedral Rock in Red Rock State Park near Sedona

Go on full-moon hikes, bird walk or spot monarch butterflies at this hidden gem. Learn more at azstateparks.com/Parks/RERO.


For more information:

Sedona Visitors Center
(928) 282-7772
331 Forest Rd.
visitsedona.com

Sedona Trolley
(928) 282-4211
www.SedonaTrolley.com

Arizona Safari Jeep Tours
(928) 282-3012
335 Jordan Road
www.safarijeeptours.com

El Portal Sedona Hotel
(800) 313-0017
95 Portal Lane
http://www.elportalsedona.com