Phantom Ranch Water Shortage

A resort on the floor of the Grand Canyon is experience water shortages due to a pipeline break. According to the National Park Service, breaks in the Trans-Canyon Water Pipeline have decreased water supplies at Phantom Ranch.
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Photo by Josh Mel

Photo by Josh Mel

A resort on the floor of the Grand Canyon is experience water shortages due to a pipeline break. According to the National Park Service, breaks in the Trans-Canyon Water Pipeline have decreased water supplies at Phantom Ranch. The series of breaks occurred two miles north of the ranch. As a result, Xanterra South Rim LLC, the resort's concessionaire, has temporarily halted the overnight accommodations and services at Phantom Ranch.

Trails in the area remain open; however, hikers should be prepared by bringing plenty of water and the appropriate water filtration devices. The National Park Service highly recommends that hikers follow these guidelines:

Plan ahead for tremendously hot temperatures. Average temperatures for July and August soar to 106 and 103 degrees, respectively.

Prepare for the hike to be more difficult than you expect. High elevation, a hot and dry climate, and a steep climb out of the canyon all lead to tough hiking conditions. Embark on a hike that's in line with your ability level.

Travel light. It's important to carry essential items like food, water, a map, a compass, first aid kit, sunscreen, a signal mirror or whistle, and water purification tablets. NPS recommends that of all the items you carry, food and water should be the heaviest.

Hike at a comfortable speed. Huffing and puffing means you're not getting enough oxygen. Walk at a pace that allows you to talk comfortably with fellow hikers.

Take breaks. NPS recommends stopping for at least 10 minutes each hour to remove the metabolic waste products that build up in your legs when hiking.

Eat and drink often. NPS suggests that hikers drink and eat more often than you feel like you need to. Every hour, drink ½ to 1 quart (liter) of water or sports drink.

Keep an eye on the time. Hiking out of the canyon is more difficult than hiking into it. NPS advises that hikers allot â…“ of their hiking time to going down into the canyon and â…” to coming back up. Bring a small, lightweight flashlight to aid your ascent if you end up hiking back in the dark.

Give mules the right of way. NPS recommends that hikers who encounter a mule train "step off the trail on the uphill side away from the edge; Follow the direction of the wrangler, and remain completely quiet and stand perfectly still; Not return to the trail until the last mule is 50 feet (15 meters) past your position."

http://www.nps.gov/grca/parknews/pipeline-break-in-grand-canyon.htm

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