Where Can I Fill My Water Bottle in the Grand Canyon?

The Grand Canyon National Park no longer sells disposable plastic water bottles. Instead visitors are encouraged to use reusable bottles and the free water bottle filling stations throughout the park.
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Water filling stations in the Grand Canyon. Photo by Whit Richardson

Water filling stations in the Grand Canyon. Photo by Whit Richardson

The Grand Canyon National Park no longer sells disposable plastic water bottles. Instead visitors are encouraged to use reusable bottles and the free water bottle filling stations throughout the park. The plastic bottle ban, approved by the National Park Service on February 6, 2012, is in an effort to reduce waste in the park. An estimated 20% of the park's waste stream and 30% of the park's recycling is comprised entirely of plastic bottles.

Drinking water filling stations have been installed in high traffic areas in the park. Like the existing water fountains and sinks in buildings and facilities throughout the park, the new filling stations provide free, Grand Canyon spring water from Roaring Springs.

Drinking Water Filling Station at the 1.5 mile resthouse on the Bright Angel Trail.

Drinking Water Filling Station at the 1.5 mile resthouse on the Bright Angel Trail. Photo by Whit Richardson.

South Rim Filling Stations

- Hermits Rest (located near the other public amenities)
- Bright Angel Trailhead
- South Kaibab Trailhead
- Canyon Village Marketplace
- Desert View Marketplace
- Yavapai Geology Museum
- Grand Canyon Visitor Center
- Verkamp's Visitor Center
- Desert View Visitor Center
- Maswik Lodge (in the cafeteria)

North Rim Filling Stations

- North Kaibab Trailhead
- North Rim Visitor Center (adjacent to the restrooms)
- North Rim Backcountry Office
- North Kaibab Trailhead (seasonal access only)
- North Rim Visitor Center (seasonal access only)

Related: Elk Have Learned how to Turn On the Water Faucets

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