Grand Canyon Filled with Clouds - Temperature Inversion

The canyon sometimes gets fog called "temperature inversion" when warm air sits on top of cold air. A partial inversion occurs a couple times each year, usually in winter. Total inversions are rare.
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Temperature Inversion at the Grand Canyon. Photo by NPS Maci MacPherson

Dec 12, 2014 temperature inversion. Photo by NPS Maci MacPherson

Temperature Inversion at the Grand Canyon. Photo by NPS Maci MacPherson

Dec 11, 2014 temperature inversion. Photo by NPS Maci MacPherson

The Grand Canyon sometimes gets fog called "temperature inversion" when warm air sits on top of cold air. Partial inversions occur a couple times each year, usually in winter.

A rare total inversion was seen December 11-12, 2014 by visitors to Grand Canyon National Park.

Another inversion was witnessed a little over a year earlier on November 29, 2013. The pictured views below are from Mather Point on the South Rim.

Grand Canyon Temperature Inversion. NPS photo by Erin Whittaker.

Nov 29, 2013 temperature inversion. NPS photo by Erin Whittaker.

Grand Canyon Temperature Inversion NPS photo by Erin Whittaker.

NPS photo by Erin Whittaker.

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