Tips For a Successful Hike in Grand Canyon

Going on a hike is wonderful way to experience the canyon's rich natural beauty.
Author:
Updated:
Original:
Hikers On North Kaibab Trail

Hikers On North Kaibab Trail

First time Grand Canyon hikers tend to react to the experience in one of two ways: either they can't wait to get back, or they swear they'll never do it again.

Going on a hike is wonderful way to experience some of the canyon's rich natural beauty and immense size. However, even if you are an avid hiker, hiking the Grand Canyon is very different from most other hiking experiences.

Mental attitude and adequate water and food consumption are absolutely essential to the success of any Grand Canyon hike, particularly in summer. The day hiker and the overnight backpacker must be equally prepared for the lack of water, extreme heat and cold, and isolation characteristic of the Grand Canyon.

Hiking in the Grand Canyon is so demanding that even people in excellent condition often emerge sore and fatigued. Yet small children, senior citizens, and people with physical disabilities have successfully hiked the canyon.

A hike into the Grand Canyon will test your physical and mental endurance. Know and respect your limitations. Moderation is the key to an enjoyable hike.

Successful hikers:

Read and follow the suggestions and regulations listed on this website.
Plan their hike before they start and go prepared.
Hike during the cooler, shadier time of the day.
Go slowly, rest often, and stay cool.
Eat salty foods and drink water or sports drink.

Related

Thunder Spring Falls. Photo by Whit Richardson

Hiking Thunder Canyon in Grand Canyon National Park

The Grand Canyon is one of the world's seven wonders, and the North Rim is its most remote destination.

The Colorado River as seen from Plateau Point off the Bright Angel Trail in the Grand Canyon

Hike the Bright Angel Trail to Plateau Point in Grand Canyon

Zigzag your way down 3,195 feet on nearly 100 switchbacks to Indian Garden, an oasis smudged into a crease in the canyon wall. Resthouses, water, phone are on the way.

Indian Garden and Three-mile Resthouse from Bright Angel Trail

Guided Grand Canyon Hiking Tours with OARS

The Rim to River hiking adventure takes you into one of the deepest parts of the Grand Canyon with an overnight stay at historic Phantom Ranch.

Relaxing while rafting on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. Photo by Whit Richardson

Tips and Tricks to Rafting in the Grand Canyon

There are some definite tricks to staying comfortable and happy on rafting trips through the Grand Canyon. Here are a few I learned on my trip.

Dusk on the South Rim and the El Tovar Hotel

Which Trail Should I Hike in the Grand Canyon?

Descriptions tell you what to expect on the trails from an easy, historic landmark tour to strenuous hikes with 2,000-plus feet elevation changes.

View from Grandview Point in the Grand Canyon

3 Best Day Hikes from the South Rim at the Grand Canyon

A day hike in the canyon can be a phenomenally enriching, and in some cases even life-changing, experience for people.

grand-canyon-trails-map

Below the Rim: Corridor Trails in the Grand Canyon

Experience Grand Canyon up close with a journey that hits these high points on its way to the Colorado River.

Hikers on South Kaibab Trail. Photo by Whit Richardson

Hike Rim to Rim via South Kaibab

Hike from Rim to Rim in the Grand Canyon on the South Kaibab Trail

Roaring Springs Waterfall along North Kaibab Trail. Photo by Whit Richardson

Grand Canyon's Roaring Springs, Art in Water

An arduous yet beautiful hike down the North Kaibab Trail, is one of the North Rim's awe-inspiring attractions - the source of drinking water in the canyon