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Reptiles in Grand Canyon National Park | Lizards, Snakes, Turtles - My Grand Canyon Park

Reptiles of the Grand Canyon

There are approximately 47 species of reptiles, including lizards and snakes, in the national park.
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Much of Grand Canyon is desert and riparian country, which means reptiles live here. Yes, those creepy, sneaky, crawly animals that many visitors might prefer to not see during their vacation and explorations.

There are approximately 47 species of reptiles in the national park. 10 are common along the Colorado River corridor and include lizards and snakes.

Below is a very brief sampling of some of the reptiles visitors may see while on their Grand Canyon vacation.

Desert Spiny Lizard

Desert Spiny Lizard

Lizards

There are approximately 47 reptile species that call the Grand Canyon home, including a variety of species of lizards. Iguanas inhabit this region, as do Gila monsters, chuckwallas, geckos and many others. The mountain short-horned lizard is another that makes its home here.

Sonoran Desert Tortoise

Sonoran Desert Tortoise

Desert Tortoise

The Desert tortoise is native to the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the southwestern U. S. This tortoise may reach 10 to 14 inches in length. Male tortoises have a longer gular horn than females. Their shells have a high "dome" and are greenish-tan to dark brown in color. The animal's front limbs have heavy, claw-like scales and are flattened for digging. Back legs are shorter and more "stumpy."

Arizona Ridgenosed Rattlesnake

Arizona Ridgenosed Rattlesnake

Rattlesnakes

Six rattlesnake species have been recorded in the park. Two are species rarely encountered, the South-western speckled rattlesnake and the Northern black-tailed rattlesnake. The other four rattlesnakes are subspecies of the Western Diamondback rattlesnake complex: the Grand Canyon pink rattlesnake, Great Basin rattlesnake, Mojave "green" rattlesnake, and Hopi rattlesnake. Of these, the Grand Canyon pink rattlesnake is the most common.

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